Having a family member that is suffering a mental health disorder can be taxing at times. Depending on the severity of the disorder, many families have been broken up because of this. Some of them can be blamed on the lack of love or patience a family member can bestow. Some just cannot handle the pressure and others just cannot take the shame.

But if the people around a person with a mental health disorder feels awkward, then what about what the actual person with the disorder feels? Many or most of these people are too afraid or ashamed to share their disorder with other people because they fear being ridiculed or judged.

Even as seeing a psychiatrist or taking mental health disorder medicines are commonplace nowadays, many people still distrust a person with a mental health problem; they feel that they are too unstable and unpredictable. Fearing what they do not know, this ignorance causes more depression and damage to a person with a mental health disorder.

Getting Over the Fear

What mental health disorder patients want is for them to be considered as normal people. Only that they need more compassion, understanding and kindness. Treat a mental health disorder afflicted person the same way as you would anyone, this would make him or her feel more normal.

As they feel more accepted and happy, they increase the chance of becoming normal. Also, be prepared; learn about the disorder that has afflicted your family or friend. Know the symptoms so you can be prepared as well.

For the patient, learn and try to accept your condition, do not be afraid of what people will say, open up your condition to them. If they can’t take it then they’re not worth it. Remember that there are many people with mental health disorder; some are not just as obvious. Hold your head up high and live with dignity.

By hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland is producing too less hormones to stimulate the metabolism or the body is not able to utilize the hormones. The lack of thyroid hormones slows down the metabolism and thus all the activities in the body, giving a combination of many symptoms related to slowness of bodily processes.

Hypothyroidism is common, but the frequency of the condition is not well determined. Some authorities estimate that 0.5% of the total American population have the disease to some degree. The frequency is much greater among people over 50 years of age than among young people.

THE SYMPTOMS AND COMPLICATIONS OF HYPOTHYROIDISM

The most common early symptoms are: Mental and physical fatigue, weakness, weight gain or over-weight, and depression.

One or more of these symptoms also use to appear early: Constipation, sensitivity to coldness, cold hands and feet, thick tongue, decreased sweating, dry hair, thin brittle hair, thin brittle nails, muscle and joint pain, pale or yellowish skin.

One or more of these symptoms usually appear later: Poor memory, slow thought process, drowsiness, slow speech, thinning of eyebrows, hoarseness, poor circulation, dry and flaky skin, decreased taste and smell, menstrual irregularities, skin thickening, puffy face, puffy hands and feet, swelling of extremities, overall swelling, muscle spasms, muscle atrophy, joint stiffness.

In children or young persons hypothyroidism may give developmental problems, like disturbed tooth development and short stature.

Hypothyroidism increases the risk of elevated cholesterol levels, heart disease and diabetes (diabetes mellitus). This occurs even by moderately decreased thyroid production.

THE THYROID GLAND AND ITS HORMONES

To understand the hypothyroidism, some knowledge about the thyroid gland and its hormones is essential.

The thyroid gland produces hormones that accelerate and in other wise regulate metabolism. A part of metabolism is the process of breaking down energy containing nutrients, and using the energy to produce molecules that all the processes and activities in the body use as fuel. Another part is the production of molecules that the body use as building materials.

The thyroid makes four hormones: Thyroxin (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), diiodothyronine (T2) and monoiodothyronine (T1). The hormones contain iodine, and the figures tell about the number of iodine atoms in each hormone molecule. T3 is not made directly, but is produced from T4. T3 is a more efficient hormone than T4. Therefore this conversion is important.

The pituitary, a gland under the brain, produces a hormone called thyrotropin or thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) that enhances the activity of the thyroid gland. If the body has too less thyroid hormone in the blood, the pituitary produces more thyrotropin. This makes the thyroid gland speed up its own production. By a too heavy thyroid hormone concentration, less thyrotropin is produced by the pituitary, and the thyroid gland slows down. This feed-back mechanism regulates the metabolism of the whole body.

THE MECHANISMS AND CAUSES OF HYPOTHYROIDISM

By hypothyroidism the body does not get enough thyroid hormone, or the hormones do not work effectively in the body. This causes the metabolism to slow down. When the metabolism decreases, the processes in the body do not get enough fuel and building materials, and all the body activities will therefore slow down. Energy containing nutrient will also be stored as fat, since they are not broken down.

Serious variants of hypothyroidism are called myxedema. This is a rare condition. However, less serious, but painful variants are common. There are several reasons for hypothyroidism, each giving a variant of the disease:

*An autoimmune reaction against the thyroid tissue can destroy the capability of the thyroid gland to produce hormones (for example Hashimoto’s disease).

*Sometimes the production of T3 by conversion from T4 is impaired. The total amount of hormones may be normal in these cases, but the body is still lacking T3, and gets the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

*Iodine deficiency can cause hypothyroidism, since the thyroid hormones contain iodine. In Europe and America the food is seldom short in iodine, but bad nutrition may result in iodine deficiency.

*Surgery or radiation at the thyroid area can destroy enough tissue to cause hypothyroidism.

*Injury or disease in the pituitary or of the part of the brain controlling the pituitary may cause a decrease in secreted thyrotropin, and then the thyroid will respond by producing less of its own hormones with hypothyroidism as a result.

*Some people have symptoms of hypothyroidism even though the amount of thyroid hormone in the blood is normal. One of the symptoms is raised levels of thyrotropin, indicating that the body signals need for more thyroid hormones. This variant may be caused by conditions elsewhere in the body that make it difficult for the hormone to reach their destination in the cells. In many of these cases the immune system produces anti-bodies against the thyroid hormones. This variant is called sub-clinical hypothyroidism, and responds to the same treatment as ordinary hypothyroidism.

*Some types of food can contribute to a depressed thyroid function or aggravate hypothyroidism when eaten raw in great amounts: Brussel sprouts, broccoli, corn oil, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, kohlrabi, radishes, rutabaga, soy and turnips. By cooking these vegetables, the depressing effect is decreased.
*Factors suspected for causing hypothyroidism are: The artificial sweetener aspartame, mercury pollution, dental fillings containing mercury, fluoride and heavy metal pollution.

HOW CAN HYPOTHYROIDISM BE TREATED

For serious hypothyroidism caused by tissue destruction, external supplement of thyroid hormones is necessary.

When the condition is caused by lack of iodine in the diet, dietary changes and iodine supplements will be a part of the treatment.

Less serious, but painful hypothyroidism is sometimes also treated with hormone supplements. In these cases it is difficult to find the right dose, and treatment may result in hormone poisoning.

You can sometimes alleviate hypothyroidism by reducing the amount of food suspected for depressing the thyroid function: Brussel sprouts, broccoli, corn oil, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, kohlrabi, radishes, rutabaga, soy, soy products and turnips. However, these food types are valuable in many ways, so it is probably not wise to cut them out totally. Also try to avoid artificial ingredients like the sweetener aspartame, conserving additives and fluoride.

Changing out mercury dental fillings and avoiding mercury or heavy metal exposure may help to ameliorate the condition.

You may also alleviate the condition by eating food that stimulates the thyroid function according to practical experience: Chia seed, dulse, fish from the ocean, flax seed, pumpkin seed, seaweed, coconut and brewer yeast.

You can find nutritional supplements to help for hypothyroidism. The compositions of these products vary:

*They may contain building materials that the thyroid uses to make its hormones, for example: iodine, acetyl-L-tyrosine or L-phenylalanine.

*They may also contain vitamins and minerals that stimulate the mechanism of hormone production by being a part of necessary enzymes, or by helping the absorption of the ingredients that hormones are made from, like: Magnesium, zinc, selenium, copper and vitamin E.

*They may furthermore contain constituents that stimulate tissue regeneration by being part of tissue building enzymes, and thus helping to restore a degraded thyroid, for example: Folic acid or folate, vitamin B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B5 (pantothenic acid or pantothenate), B6 (pyridoxine), B12 (cyanocobalamin) and molybdenum.

Men- it’s time to take care of your bodies! Most of you take better care of your cars than you do your health. Why is this? According to new medical information, the essential male blunder is the notion many men have that a real man is a man with no vulnerabilities. Well it’s time to recognize you can seek help when you need it, and you should before it’s too late.

What can all this neglect lead to? Here’s some major health errors men tend to make:

* Denying the obvious. Blood in the stool, weird rashes or moles, sudden thirstiness.
* Denying even something as serious as a heart attack. When the signs of a heart attack appear you should immediately call 911.
* Not getting a prostate exam because it’s unpleasant. A digital rectal exam is a screening test for prostate cancer, and is recommended to be done along with a PSA blood test.
* Not being examined for colon cancer. Most men should have a colonoscopy starting at 50 and every five to 10 years thereafter.
* Not being aware of testosterone levels. Experts recommend getting serum testosterone blood tests in middle age.
* Not checking yourself for testicular cancer. Strikes younger men, 15 to 35.
* Eating an unhealthy diet. Fat intake should be maximum 10% of your diet.
* Hiding depression. Ask for help, treatment is often very successful.
* Smoking. Your doctor can give you a regimen to quit.

No- you don’t have to wait for something to fall off before you go to the doctor. Take these symptoms seriously and get help if you think you need it. And we wonder why men have a shorter life expectancy than women. Brush off the embarrassment and visit your doctor regularly.

Who doesn’t want glowing, vibrant, and younger looking skin? Everyone aspires to have a healthy and blemish-free skin. Still, many of us find our skin to be quite impossible to manage especially when you wake up and find a huge zit on your nose or a cold sore at the corner of your mouth. The good news is that there are ways to prevent and treat common skin problems by checking in the food we take.

Did you know that dry skin during the summer might easily be remedied with a handful of nuts? We have all heard the old saying, we are what we eat. Often we ignore how our diets affect problems, such hair loss or oily skin. Most experts say eating a balanced diet is the best way to get your share of good food for healthy skin. Still, a number of specific food can be consumed to bring back the healthy glow to your skin.

Probably one of the most important components of skin health is Vitamin A. One can get it from low-fat dairy products. In fact, experts say that the health of our skin cells is dependent on dietary Vitamin A. Low-fat yogurt is also “good skin food” since it is high in Vitamin A and acidophilus, the “live” bacteria that is good for intestinal health.

Aside from milk and yoghurt, fruits and berries are also good for the skin. Blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, and plums have a lot of antioxidants and phytochemicals that protects the cell from damage that can be harmful to the skin. Other fruits and vegetables with a “high antioxidant capacity” include artichokes, beans (the study cited black, red, and pinto), prunes, and pecans. Salmon, walnuts, canola oil, and flax seed all deliver essential fatty acids, and thus are key foods for healthy skin.

The best-known essential fatty acids are Omega-3 and Omega-6, which are healthy ingredients that must be part of our daily diet. Though we all seem to get enough Omega-6, fish, walnut, and flax seed oil are among the best sources.

Eating good-quality oils helps keep skin lubricated and keeps it looking and feeling healthier overall. However, only those that are labeled cold pressed, expeller processed, or extra virgin are the ones to look for. Since any fat, even a healthy one, is high in calories, experts remind us that we don’t need more than about two tablespoons a day.

Whole-wheat bread, muffins, and cereals; turkey, tuna, and brazil nuts are mineral selenium which connects all these foods for healthy skin. Experts say selenium plays a key role in the health of skin cells. Some studies show that even skin damaged by the sun may suffer fewer consequences if selenium levels are high.

Some beverages like Green Tea also possess beneficial properties that are good for the skin. This drink deserves a category all its own in any article about food for healthy skin. The skin-health properties of Green Tea are amazing. It has anti-inflammatory properties, and it protects the cell membrane. It may even help prevent or reduce the risk of skin cancer.

While the exact amount you should drink each day varies, no one disputes the role good hydration plays in keeping skin looking healthy and even young. When that hydration comes from pure, clean water, (not liquids such as soda or even soup) experts say that skin cells actually “rejoice” since the fluid helps flush out toxins and impurities from the body. When we’re properly hydrated, we also sweat more efficiently. Doing so helps keep skin clean and clear as well.

Everything we eat becomes a part of not only our inner being, but the outer fabric of our body as well. No skin care solutions or treatments can replace having a healthy diet. The healthier the food we consume, the less stress we feel, and the better our skin will look.

Signs are pointing to a coming physician shortage in America. With the headaches that will bring, universal care should be the last hardship the government hangs around our necks.

The Los Angeles Times has reported that the “Demand for doctors is accelerating more rapidly than supply.” The results will be — and already are in some places — frustrating: longer waiting periods to see physicians, particularly specialists; more trips to see a doctor; and decisions by many to simply forgo care.

Sounds a lot like Canada’s nationalized health care system.

Canadian health care, held up by many as the model the U.S. should adopt, is a disaster largely because of the enormous demand it has created. Consequently, Canadians are suffering through a pandemic of poor health care at a time when technology should be helping them live much longer and healthier lives than could have been imagined a generation ago.

North of the border, unreasonably long waiting periods are the cause of much suffering — even death. Drugs and modern medical equipment that most Americans take for granted are in short supply. Hospitals are overcrowded, and doctors and nurses, fed up with it all, are quitting.

Blame a system under which a third party (the government, using tax dollars), pays for health care, thereby stimulating demand. When someone else pays the bill, people will consume more health care than if they were paying for it themselves. This is common sense. With demand artificially ratcheted up, the system cannot provide enough services to keep up.

Such a system is unsustainable. So why force a similar one on the U.S. when there aren’t enough doctors now to keep up with the growing demand for medical services?

Physician search firm Merritt, Hawkins & Associates says it already takes an average 24 days for U.S. patients to see a dermatologist for a routine skin cancer checkup. And that’s in our biggest cities, not rural areas. Waiting times are similar for gynecologists (23 days) and cardiologists (19). Universal care will only make these and other waits longer.

America’s doctor shortage doesn’t lend itself to a public policy solution. It’s largely demographic: As baby boomers retire in record numbers — and likely get sick in record numbers as well — doctors within the baby boom cohort also will be retiring. By 2020, the U.S. could be short 90,000 to 200,000 doctors, Merritt, Hawkins estimates.

That means even longer hours for younger doctors, at least those who haven’t been run out of the profession by excessive malpractice insurance premiums fueled by outrageous malpractice lawsuits and jury awards.
Medical schools want to boost enrollment in response to the low supply. But as long as the financial incentives of the profession are clipped by sue-happy trial lawyers, runaway juries and obliging courts, the shortage is unlikely to self-correct.

What are you to do? Take health care into your own hands of course. Try homeopathic or nutritional supplementation. Thus, eliminating the expensive cost of health care, time needed to see a doctor and the overall problem of even getting sick.

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Take control of your health today. The health & wellness industry is expected to be a “Trillion Dollar Industry” by 2010. Supplementation use is growing and being fueled significantly by baby boomers. Now is the time to get on board the prevention and wellness industry.

To the best of your health

What is fiber? Fiber is the indigestible part of plant foods. They are usually the walls of the plant cells, skins and seeds. Due to refining of foods much of the fiber has been lost in our diets causing digestive problems and overall poor health.

How does fiber help your digestive tract? It absorbs water when it moves through the digestive tract and forms bulk in the intestines. This will soften stool and help food move faster through the digestive system.

List of common foods that contain fiber:

Brussels Sprouts, 2 grams
Broccoli, 4-5 grams
Bread, 4-7 grams – 2 slices whole wheat, pumpernickel, seven-grain
Carrots, 3-4 grams
Bran Cereals, 5-10 grams – All-Bran, Bran Buds, 100% Bran, Raisin Bran
Beans, 6-10 grams – baked beans, black beans, great northern beans, kidney beans, garbanzos, pinto beans, white beans
Berries, 4-5 grams – blackberries, raspberries
Sweet Corn, 5 grams
Beans
Peas, 7-9 grams – black-eyed peas, green peas
Greens, 4-6 grams – beet greens, collards, kale, spinach, turnip greens
Bananas, 3 grams – medium 8″ long
Dried Figs, 10 grams – 3 figs
Fruit, 4 grams – medium apple, medium pear

According to the American Dietetic Association a healthy adult needs 20g-35g of fiber per day. However the average person is only consuming 14-15 grams. This is leading to digestive problems and contributing to the growing problem of obesity. Research is uncovering proof that fiber is helpful in prevention and relief from a variety of serious diseases.

Easy ways to increase fiber:

Eating brown whole wheat bread instead of refined white bread
Including more lentils, fruits and vegetables in your diet (see above list for some of these)
Eating brown rice instead of refined white rice
Eating bran cereal or granola cereal for breakfast

When you increase fiber in your diet you will experience some bloating and gas problems at first. However these will all subside in a matter of weeks as your body gets used to your new improved diet.

Food supplements for fiber: Because it is often quite hard to include the amount of fiber we need in our diets supplements can sometimes be taken to increase fiber and for treatment of certain conditions. These will all help digestive disorders.

Psyllium husk- is a common supplement (Metamucil)
Methylcellulose-made naturally from the cell walls of plants (Celvic, Celevac)
Polycarbophil-is based on plant sources- This may cause less bloating than Psyllium husk (Fibercon, Equalactin) This is often used when treating digestive disorders

Vegetable gums: A new form of fiber supplement is Vegetable gums- guar gum (brand name Benefiber) or acacia (brand name Heather’s Tummy Fiber).

Increasing fiber in your diet will help your digestive system function better. This will result in lowering cholesterol and improving your overall health. With improved health you will be able to feel better, look better, think better and enjoy your life to the full.

For centuries, alcoholic beverages have been linked to a temporary decrease in male sexual inhibitions. Nobody’s really been sure of why this was the case, other than the alcohol having an effect on the parts and biochemicals in the brain that regulate things like sexual health. Side effects like increased arousal and decreased inhibitions were accepted as part and parcel of exposure to enough amounts of alcohol, though only recently has there been any research conducted into finding the physiological reasons behind these effects.

Using an animal model to study the effects of alcohol, research teams in Pennsylvania State University attempted to find the exact physiological effects of chronic alcohol exposure to a person’s physical, mental, and sexual health. The team noted that there was a distinct lack of studies involving animal models to look at the effects of chronic exposure to alcohol. Kyung-An Han, the leader of the team, also noted that their research differed because they administered regular doses of ethanol – the main intoxicating component of alcohol – to the animals. This is in contrast to the short-term dosing method used by previous attempts at this study. Han believes their approach would produce more reliable and realistic results.

The first result they observed that was related to sexual health was the drop in courtship inhibitions among the intoxicated test subjects, which were fruit flies. Fruit fly males, which normally only initiated courtship with females, suddenly exhibited courtship behavior with other males. Han believes that dopamine was somehow involved, because this behavior was not observed when they altered the temperature to prevent dopamine from being transmitted to the brain. It was also noted that continued exposure to ethanol increased the likelihood that the male fruit flies would initiate courtship behavior with other males.

Chronic tolerance of the effects of the ethanol was also observed in the flies, which meant that the more exposed they were, the larger the doses required to “intoxicate” them. This has also been noted in other animals, though there have been very few scientific studies dedicated to exploring the long-term possibilities and effects of such exposure. The only concrete medical knowledge into the matter concerns the effects of long-term alcohol use in various human organs and systems, but no real data on the effects it might have on sexual health and behavior.

It was also noted that inter-male courtship behavior among the fruit flies seemed to be more likely with age. The research team found that the older the fruit fly, the more susceptible it was to the effects of ethanol exposure. In theory, this holds true for most other animals. Han’s team observed that the older the fly was and the lower the tolerance for ethanol, the more likely it was to exhibit inter-male courtship behavior.

Han’s team hopes that their study would prove to form an effective, reliable baseline for further research into the cellular and molecular interactions with alcohol in animals. Han hoped that the study would help provide evidence that sexual health and behavior was not only influenced by developmental factors, but by post-developmental influences as well.